The Structure of Words at the Interfaces

Editors: Heather Newell, Máire Noonan, Glyne Piggott, Lisa deMena Travis

Our OUP volume will be coming out soon!  We are in the proofs stage — planning for a UK release date of March/April 2017 and North American release date of May/June 2017.

Visit the OUP website here.

One of the most pressing, and unanswered, questions about the interrelationships between phonology, morphology, and syntax is the status of the notion ‘word’. Much current syntactic theory assumes that words are built through application of syntactic (as opposed to specially morphological) rules, but the extended consequences of this view are not commonly focused upon. In this volume, the editors have brought together a series of chapters, across a wide range of language types, that examine what motivates the different theoretical stances on this question, what these perspectives share, and how and why they are different. The volume as a whole leads to the conclusion that the syntax feeds into the relevant morphophonological notion of word in a fashion that is both asymmetric and complex, but not unconstrained.

Table of Contents

1: Introduction, Heather Newell, Máire Noonan, Glyne Piggott, and Lisa Travis
2: Nested phase interpretation and the PIC, Heather Newell
3: Wordhood and word internal domains, Glyne Piggott and Lisa Travis
4: Syntactic domain types and PF effects, Bethany Lochbihler
5: Exceptions to the ‘Mirror Principle’ and Morphophonological ‘Action at a distance’, Neil Myler
6: Quantitative component interaction: Data from Tagalog nasal substitution, Kie Ross Zuraw
7: Suppletion is local: Evidence from Hiaki, Jonathan David Bobaljik and Heidi Harley
8: The paradoxes of Mebengokre’s analytic causative, Andrés Pablo Salanova
9: Ein is Ein and that is that: A note on anti-homophony and meta-morphology, Thomas Leu
10: Dutch and German R-pronouns and P-stranding, Máire Noonan
11: Adjunction of complex heads inside words: A reply to Piggott and Travis (2013), Eric Mathieu, Brandon J. Fry, and Michael Barrie
12: Verb stem formation and event composition in Oji-Cree, Tanya Slavin
13: Adjuncts as a diagnostic of polysynthetic word-formation in Inuit, Richard Compton

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